Theoretical Physics

theoretical physics
Department leader
György Wolf

The mission of the Department of the Theoretical Physics is the theoretical investigation of the fundamental questions of nature. There are three major research areas at the department: quantum field theory, particle and heavy ion physics and gravitation. Part of the research is directly related to ongoing experiments of heavy ions, particle physics (LHC, RHIC) and gravitational wave detection (VIRGO).

The list of current research topics includes the following: phenomenological and theoretical study on relativistic heavy ion collisions; non-extensive thermodynamics; integrable classical and quantum field theories; quantum symmetries; extended objects in field theories; analytical and numerical studies of Einstein’s equations, problems related to gravitational wave detection.

The topic of our research is in the intersection of mathematics and physics. We study questions related to algebraic field theory - such as the reconstruction of superselection symmetries, the construction of field algebra, the classification of phases - using mathematical methods and standards...
High-energy heavy-ion physics is connected to a large variety of physics disciplines, therefore researches made into this direction possess a large variety. The research directions range from the fundamental concepts of classical and modern thermodynamics, hydrodynamics, and quantum theory to perturbative and non-perturbative QCD, high-energy nuclear effects, hadronization and hadron phenomenology...
According to the holographic conjuncture, our universe of three space dimensions and one time dimension might be equivalent to the four+one dimension universe, containing only gravity. We would be the holograms of four-dimensional objects in the gravitational universe - on its three-dimensional edge -and everything we do could be explained through higher- dimension gravitational processes...
Our research focuses on understanding how the nervous system works. In particular, we aim to explore the computations executed by the brain. We apply two approaches in our research. On the one hand, we use high-level computational models to try and understand how people represent the different elements of the outside world in perception and learning. In order to do this, we examine behavioural data from cognitive psychology experiments in machine learning systems, often using the tools of Bayesian statistics...
The fundamental mission of the Theoretical Neuroscience and Complex Systems research group, working within the Wigner RC Department of Theoretical Physics, is to promote the understanding of complex systems, concentrating primarily on the functioning of the nervous system...
The members of the Gravitational Physics Research Group are involved in various research activities including field theory, numerical and post-Newtonian general relativity, experimental gravitational wave data analysis and fundamental research in algorithm optimization and many-core computer science.
Our nervous system represents information in the activity patterns of the neurons, and the transformation of these patterns constitutes the basis of processing. Due to improving computing capacity, the activity of hundreds of cells can now be measured, with a good time-resolution...